Teaching Philosophy

Piano Students

Students age 3 and up are welcome, beginner through advanced levels. Note reading, rhythm, hand-eye coordination, finger dexterity, posture, musicality, and expression are among the many skills developed. I also incorporate a healthy dose of music theory as well as music history in order to offer a well-rounded approach to music in addition to the specific study of the instrument. Students are introduced to a variety of styles such as classical, jazz, Broadway and popular tunes, within the framework of a classical technique. Students develop efficient practice habits, self-discipline, and sensitivity through their musical studies.



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Violin Students

Students age 7 and up are welcome, beginner through advanced levels. Students younger than age 7 wishing to begin lessons will be evaluated on a case by case basis. Note reading, rhythm, coordination, finger dexterity, posture, musicality, and expression are among the many skills developed. Technique is a traditional approach, though some aspects of the Suzuki method are employed where appropriate. Students develop efficient practice habits, self-discipline, and sensitivity through their musical studies. Students younger than age 7 are highly encouraged to begin by studying piano prior to approaching the violin. This has been proven to move a student forward more quickly when they do begin violin because they will have mastered the fundamentals of note reading, finger technique, and some understanding of musicality and expression.



Conclusion

The study of music is different from any other activity because it engages the whole person. Unlike sports (primarily physical) and academic pursuit (mental), it combines both the physical and mental simultaneously. Through piano study, the student will not only learn the skills necessary to execute a performance of a piece of music; he or she will develop mental skills exclusive to those who have studied music, creativity, emotional expression, discipline, self-esteem, and successively, the appreciation of other art forms.



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